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Glossary

Ad Card: A presentation of information about a Publisher's Advertising Zone, the current rates, and available inventory to buy advertising space on a particular Zone.

Ad Rotation: Different ads are rotated in a Zone for display on a Web page. This is done automatically by our software. Direct Buy ads will be shown if any are scheduled. When there is no Direct Buy ad to be shown, AdJungle will show one of the ten default campaigns for each Zone.

Ad Space: The space on a webpage reserved to display advertising.

Ad View: The display of a single creative to a consumer on a Web site. A single page view can have more than one impression if there is more than one advertisement on the page. See Impression.

Advertiser: Any individual or entity purchasing online advertising space including agencies, affiliates, small and large business, and sole proprietors.

Banner: A 468x60 pixel interactive online advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs across the top or bottom of a webpage. May be GIF or JPEG images or Rich Media such as Flash. Many ads are animated since animation has been shown to be more effective. The Leaderboard is 468 pixels wide by 60 pixels high. See Creative.

Booked Space: Website advertising space that is already sold or otherwise unavailable to receive new campaign commitments.

Browser: An application used to access files from the Internet. Common browsers are Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Netscape's Navigator, Apple's Safari, and Opera Software's Opera.

Button: An interactive online advertisement in the form of a small graphic image. Buttons are typically 88 x 31 pixels.

Campaign: A campaign links a specific creative to a destination URL. A campaign can be scheduled to be displayed on multiple publishers.

Click, Click-Thru or Click-Through: The activation of a hyperlink using a mouse or other input device. The click-through is essential to the interactivity of online advertising.

Click-Through Rate (or Ratio) (CTR) : The rate of activated ads to total ads displayed. A typical CTR is 0.5% (1 in 200). Also called Click-Through Percent. The click-through rate of an advertising creative is one measure of its effectiveness.

Click-through URL: When users click on a banner or text link, the click-through URL is the new destination to which they are directed.

Click Tracking: The process of counting and auditing the clicks for a campaign. Click tracking can be done by a different entity than that which serves the creative.

Cookie: Cookies are very tiny text files that are stored on your computer when you visit certain web pages that record your preferences. They cannot harm your computer and they do not contain any personal or private information. Most cookies expire after a certain time period. The most popular browsers, such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer, can be set to give you the option of accepting or rejecting all cookies. Unlike many other networks, AdJungle does not set a cookie on user's computers as part of the ad serving process.

Cost per 1,000 Impressions (CPM): An advertising pricing model based on payments for displaying a number of impressions of a particular creative on a Publisher's site. The vast majority of online banner advertising is priced using the CPM model. The "M" is the Roman numeral for 1,000. This model came from the offline advertising world, not the computer side, which is why the "M" and not the expected "K". This is a major unit used on the AdJungle site for direct purchases on specific sites (zones); the CPM rate is set by the website owner.

Cost per Action or Acquisition (CPA): An advertising campaign pricing model based on paying for a specific action - be it a click, download, lead, or purchase.

Cost per Click (CPC): A CPA pricing method that pays a fee for each click on an advertisement. Some CPC models use an auction or competitive model to vary the price for a click, and others are based on a fixed fee per click over a campaign. AdJungle uses this model for advertisers that wish to purchase unused inventory on the AdJungle sites. See Cost per Action (CPA).

Cost per Lead (CPL): A CPA pricing method that typically pays a fixed fee for the acquisition of a customer lead, such as a filled out form or an opt-in email address. See Cost per Action (CPA).

Cost per Sale (CPS): A CPA pricing method that typically pays a transaction percentage for the acquisition of a customer that makes a purchase. See Cost per Action (CPA).

Creative: The materials used in advertising to convey a message. AdJungle creatives can be static graphic, animated graphic, or Rich Media HTML. See Banner, Button, Skyscraper, Rich Media.

Data Reporting: The presentation and delivery of publisher website and advertiser campaign data. Data reporting is typically a combination of tabular and graphic presentation.

Demographics: Statistical data that describes the makeup of a given user base, and includes information such as age range, gender, education levels, and average household income.

Default Ad: Campaign that will be shown if there is no Direct Buy campaign. Zones have ten Default slots, with eight available that can be controlled by the Site owner.

Direct Buy: Advertising campaign that has been placed by an Advertiser into a Publisher's Zone.

Displays: How many times the advertising zone or ad campaign was displayed to a reader.

Exclusive: A contract that forces a Publisher to sell all specified inventory through a certain channel for a specified period of time. Advertisers can also be bound to purchase media only through a certain channel for a specified period of time. AdJungle does not use exclusive contracts.

Flash: An animated graphics technology and format from Macromedia. Macromedia's applications, as well as many other third-party authoring programs, generate Flash files, which can be viewed through a Web browser plug-in (the Flash player) or multimedia applications that access the player directly.

Graphic Interchange Format (GIF): A common graphics format that can be displayed on almost all web browsers. GIFs typically display in 256 colors and have built-in compression. Photographic images are not well suited for use in the GIF format. Static or animated GIF images are the most common form of banner creative.

Hit: The sending of a single file from a web server to a user's computer. Most webpages contain several files, including all HTML, graphics, audio, etc. Hit is not the same as impression, page view, or number of unique visitors. Information about hits is of little value as a metric of online advertising, or online use in general and should not be used. "HITS" stands for "How Idiots Track Success" according to some experienced industry veterans. See Displays.

Host: The individual or website that displays online advertising. See Publisher.

Hyperlink: The foundation of online interactivity. This is the clickable link in text or graphics on a webpage that takes you to another place on the same page, another page, or another website.

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML): A coding language used to make hypertext documents for use online.

Hypertext: The text version of the hyperlink.

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP): The networking protocol that allows hyperlinks to work.

Impression: The display of a single creative to a consumer on a website. A single page view can have more than one impression if there is more than one advertisement. See Ad View.

Inventory: The ad space available for sale on a website. Ad inventory is determined by the number of ads on a page, the number of pages containing ad space and an estimate of future page views.

Internet Protocol Address (IP Address): The numerical system used to identify the components of the Internet. Every system connected to the Internet has a unique IP address. In the current system (IPv4), there are only 4.3 billion unique IP addresses.

Java: An object-oriented programming language developed by Sun Microsystems, Java supports animation and real-time information transfer. Web pages that have Java applets embedded are recognized by Java supported web browsers.

JavaScript: A scripting language developed by Netscape to enable Web authors to design interactive sites. Although it shares many of the features and structures of the full Java language, it was developed independently. Javascript can interact with HTML source code, enabling Web authors to spice up their sites with dynamic content. JavaScript is endorsed by a number of software companies and is an open language that anyone can use without purchasing a license.

Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG): Easily compressed graphics format that displays photographic as well as graphic images. JPEG is better suited to photographic images.

Keyword: A word or phrase used to focus an online search and to target advertising. Advertisers can purchase keywords on search engines to guarantee that their website information is displayed prominently and/or display an associated creative. AdJungle uses Keywords to better match default ads and to help Advertisers find appropriate Publishers.

Leaderboard: A 728x90 pixel interactive online advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs across the top or bottom of a webpage. May be GIF or JPEG images or Rich Media such as Flash. Many ads are animated since animation has been shown to be more effective. The Leaderboard is 728 pixels wide by 90 pixels high. See Creative.

Link: See Hyperlink.

Metric: Any standardized measurement used for comparison purposes. Online advertising metrics include Click-through Ratio and Unique Page Views.

Multi Level Marketing (MLM): This is any marketing structure that has 3+ levels. This type of marketing generally has strict regulations and should be entered into carefully.

Page View: The loading of a webpage by a browser. A single User Session may result in multiple page views and numerous Impressions. Reload of the same page is another page view.

Pay Per Click (PPC): See Cost per Click.

Pay Per Impression (PPI): See Cost per 1,000 Impressions.

Pay Per Lead (PPL): See Cost per Lead.

Pay Per Sale (PPS): See Cost per Sale.

Pop-Under: A window that pops (launches automatically) behind the current browser window, as opposed to the more visible (and annoying) pop-up ad which opens a window in front of the current window.

Publisher: An individual or entity selling online advertising space, including portal media planners, Webmasters and other ad networks. Publisher, web publisher, Webmaster and host are synonymous with respect to online advertising.

Rectangle: A 300x250 pixel interactive online advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs in the middle of content of a webpage. May be GIF or JPEG images or Rich Media such as Flash. Many ads are animated since animation has been shown to be more effective. The Leaderboard is 300 pixels wide by 250 pixels high. See Creative.

Remnant Advertising: Advertisements shown as default ads on Web sites in an AdJungle category. You will choose which category you want for your campaign. Remnant advertising is low priority and will be superseded by any purchased ad campaign.

Return on Investment (ROI): The actual or perceived future value of an expense or investment. Ad campaign ROI is a metric that attempts to determine what the advertiser receives in return for the cost of the advertising, usually in terms of new sales. This is a measure of your profits of a campaign after all associated costs have been deducted. The higher the ROI, the higher the success level of the campaign.

Rich Media: A general term used to describe advances in online creative that take advantage of enhanced sensory features such as HTML ads, animation, audio, and video. Rich media takes many different digital file forms. The serving of rich media creative can require more bandwidth and software modifications for older systems. Rich media creative will become more useful as user bandwidth increases.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM): This is similar to SEO and also includes pay per click marketing, paid inclusion, and anything that drives traffic to sites by use of search engines.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO): This is a method used by site designers and content writers to create their site in such a way that it is very search engine friendly. It is most commonly used to improve rankings within the search engines.

Serving: The real-time, controlled distribution of advertising creative to publisher websites.

Skyscraper: A 120x600 pixel interactive online advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs vertically along the sides of a webpage. May be GIF or JPEG images or Rich Media such as Flash. Many ads are animated since animation has been shown to be more effective. The Leaderboard is 120 pixels wide by 600 pixels high. See Creative.

Slot: Adjungle divides each Zone into slots; each slot contains an ad that is shown to the reader, and AdJungle rotates through each slot to mix up the ads. An advertiser can purchase 1 or more slots on a zone.

Sponsorship: A "long term" advertising relationship that typically involves the payment of a fixed fee to display a banner or other graphic on a website, or be included in an email newsletter.

Statistics (Stats): Data about the use of a website or the effectiveness of an ad campaign. The depth and breadth of stats is unlimited.

Surplus Inventory: Website ad space available for purchase. Surplus inventory is often Remnant Space.

Tag: HTML fragment that enables a website to serve an impression.

Tracking: The collection and automated analysis of data associated with the serving of digital creative. Tracking provides the frequency control, accounting, stats data and anti-fraud components of a campaign.

Traffic: The volume of visitors to a website. Traffic is the currency of online success, but is not the only factor. Massive, low grade traffic to a website with poor content is not nearly as valuable as a lower volume of loyal and interested users. Sites with specialty content generally have more valuable traffic than general interest portals.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL): an HTTP address used by the World Wide Web to specify a certain site. This is the unique identifier, or address, of a webpage on the Internet. For example, http://AdJungle.com is the URL of this site.

Unique Page Views: The total number of unique pages on a website by a unique visitor.

Unique Visitor and User Session: A unique IP address visiting a website for the first time in a specified period. Unique visitor is more often associated with long periods of time, such as a month. User session is more often associated with shorter periods of time, such as 30 minutes. Both are valuable traffic metrics for many websites. Even so, there is no exact definition when talking about Web site statistics. Always find out how a site determined their number so you can compare to others.

Web Page: The traditional presentation of information online. Websites are made up of webpages, analogous to the pages in a book. If frames are used, multiple pages can be displayed at the same time, resulting in multiple Page Views.

Webmaster: The individual responsible for the management of a website. See Publisher.

Web Site: A virtual location online designated by a unique URL. A website is made up of one or more webpages.

Web Site Categories: System of grouping based on content or demographic interests. These may include women's interests, automotive, and financial sites, etc.

Website Profile: Details that may include historical traffic volume and demographic information about visitors to the website, or a portion thereof.

Wide Skyscraper: A 160x600 pixel interactive online advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs vertically along the sides of a webpage. May be GIF or JPEG images or Rich Media such as Flash. Many ads are animated since animation has been shown to be more effective. The Leaderboard is 160 pixels wide by 600 pixels high. See Creative.

Zone: AdJungle ads are placed into Zones on Publisher Web sites. A Zone could be an entire site (i.e. every page on a site), or it could be a portion of a site that is set apart by its content or user demographics. Larger sites will set up multiple Zones to better target the advertisements served.

 

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